From the Garden this Week…

From the Garden this Week…

Lettuce Heads, Tomatoes, Summer Squash, Green Beans, Cucumbers, Carrots, Basil, Bell Peppers and Hot Peppers, Eggplant (full share only), Garlic, Flowers, Santa Rosa Plums and Apricots

Coming Soon… Melons and Sweet Corn

Using your Produce… by Julie Moreno

Summer’s bounty is in full swing. I included in today’s recipes simple ideas to use the tomatoes. We do pick the tomatoes slightly under ripe. This allows them to hold up best for transport and gives them a longer life. They will ripen the rest of the way on your counter. Let them sit upside down in a single layer until you are ready to use them.  The first is a Tomato Basil Salad. This is the simplest of recipes and one of the best. When you have fewer ingredients in a recipe there is no place for bad taste to hide.  This is where you want to use your best extra virgin olive oil. We will take care of the tomatoes and basil. The Pico de Gallo is a simple salsa that is easy to make.  When slicing tomatoes use your sharpest knife, if you don’t have one that is very sharp, use a serrated bread knife.​​

Tomato Basil Salad


2-3 large tomatoes, sliced

1-2 balls fresh mozzarella, sliced

6-7 basil leaves, sliced

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

Salt

Fresh ground black pepper

On a large serving platter arrange the alternating slices of tomatoes and mozzarella cheese. Sprinkle basil leaves on top and drizzle with oil and vinegar. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Let sit for 15 minutes then eat.


Pico de Gallo


3-4 large tomatoes, diced small

½ cup red or white onion, finely diced

1-2 hot peppers, finely diced

3-4 tablespoons cilantro, coarsely chopped

1 tablespoon lemon or lime juice

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper


Combine all ingredients and let sit for 15-20 minutes before serving, if possible.


Santa Rosa Plum Sorbet

This recipe calls for 6 cups of Santa Rosa plums, but you can adjust the recipe to use even just 1 cup of plums.  If you leave the plums on your counter, they will become softer and sweeter after several days.  Some people enjoy a tart and firm plum and, in that case, enjoy right away.

6 cups of pitted plums with skin on.

1 cup of sugar (add more if needed to taste)

1 Tbls of honey or corn syrup

1 Tbls lemon juice

Puree in a blender.  Mix in an ice-cream maker or simply freeze in a freezer container that you can fit an ice cream scoop into.  Thaw slightly and scrape into a ball with an ice cream scoop.  OPT:  Serve with a tablespoon of plain heavy whipping cream on top which will form a nice crust over the sorbet.  Enjoy!


Summer’s bounty in a salad…

This classic French salad is perfect especially when you have all of the ingredients in your basket. If you don’t have Nicoise olives you can substitute any other olive except canned black mission olives. This is not the place for them. If you don’t like olives, you can leave them out, I won’t tell.

Tuna Nicoise Salad

2 Tablespoons lemon juice or red wine vinegar

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 Tablespoon finely chopped shallot or onion

2 Tablespoon chopped fresh basil

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 pound yukon gold or red potatoes, cooked and sliced

1 small head lettuce, chopped and washed

1 cucumber, sliced

1 cup chopped tomatoes

¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced

1/2 pound beans, trimmed and blanched

1/4 cup niçoise olives, chopped

8 ounces fresh grilled tuna steak or 1 can of tuna

3 hard boiled eggs, peeled and quartered lengthwise


Combine the lemon juice, oil, onion, herbs, mustard, salt and pepper together and shake in a jar or whisk in a bowl.  In a very large mixing bowl, combine the potatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, red onion, beans and olives.  Pour the dressing over the salad and toss gently.  Serve on a large platter and top with the eggs and tuna.  Season with salt and pepper as needed.

Metaphors of Soil and Soul…by Ronda May Melendez

Fellowship and intimacy...what powerful words. Even in a garden, fellowship and intimacy can be found between the Planter and the earth; between the co-laborers in our lives. Cindi speaks often of the fellowship enjoyed among our charitable garden volunteers.  Indeed, we jointly contribute; we collaborate and intimate according to the mission of the garden. We do our part to bring forth fruit to the delight of others.  Similarly, in this life, we are able to collaborate with the Planter, who plants in the soil of our souls.  Our Creator planted a seed that was intimate with the soil in Genesis 2.  Each plant sprouted life according to its creative purpose, according to its own specific design. What has the Planter planted in you? Will you collaborate according to how He has designed you in order to bring forth the true expression of your being? I sure hope so. We all need to hear and see unique expressions of truth and love; you are the only one who can present it!   Blessings to you all. I cheer you on from here. 


“Intimacy is a deep abiding confidence that someone knows you, cares for you, desires and delights in your presence.”

       ---    Keith F. Martin



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